5 exercises for the prevention of wrist injuries

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The wrist joints are not sweet. You spent several hours at the computer or in the gym, small bones between the palm and forearm were subjected to a massive attack. Here goes the first line of defense.

Author: Robert Haley

In sports, the wrist joints are always under fire. Falling on your hand during a soccer game and even a simple ball kick can lead to a blunt wrist injury. Throwing a ball, flapping a bat or boxing blow, too, subject the wrist joints to a serious load.

The wrist joint is formed by eight small bones (carpal bones) and two large bones of the forearm (radial and ulnar). In it, flexion and extension (movement of the palm forward or backward relative to the forearm), as well as reduction and retraction (similar to the motion of the pendulum). Good flexibility and stability of the joint is important for the prevention of injuries.

One of the typical problems of the training process is carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), or carpal tunnel syndrome. Its cause is irritation or compression of the radial nerve, which begins in the upper parts of the arm and descends down to the fingertips. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passage in the region of the same joint, formed by bones and ligaments through which the radial nerve passes.

Compression of the nerve trunk due to edema, tendenitis, or degenerative process in bone tissue is felt as pain, tingling, or numbness. Symptoms most often observed in the area of ​​the brush, which includes a large, index and middle finger, as well as half of the nameless. Very often CTS occurs in people who work at a computer, because of the same type of repeated movements when typing on the keyboard.

However, the repeated movements of strength training, in which the wrist joint participates, can also cause carpal tunnel syndrome. Constant pain in the arm or fingers, tingling or numbness may indicate CTS. If you have experienced similar symptoms, reconsider your program and try to reduce the strain on your wrist. If the changes do not solve the problem, you may need the help of a specialist. But even if now you feel well – although, unwittingly, overload the wrist joint – take preventive measures.

Exercises to prevent CTS and wrist injuries

Consider stretch marks and exercises that will help you avoid wrist problems. If during these exercises you feel pain, tingling or numbness, go through a diagnostic examination for CTS.

Exercise 1. Extension of extensor hand

Pull one hand out in front of you, and with the other hand, pull the brush toward the palm surface. You should feel a weak or moderately expressed stretch on the back surface of the forearm. Hold your hand in this position for 10-15 seconds, then repeat with the second hand and make three approaches.

Exercise 2. Extension of flexor flexors

Pull one arm out in front of you, and the other hand, pull the brush toward the back surface. You should feel a slight or moderate stretching of the flexors of the forearm. Hold your hand in this position for 10-15 seconds, then repeat with the second hand and make three approaches.

Exercise 3. Bending the brush with the expander

Wrap the expander around the palm of your hand. Bend your arms at the elbows at an angle of 90 degrees, as during bending on the biceps, turn your palms up. Slowly flex the wrist joint at the expense of the muscles of the hand and forearm. Perform each hand 3 approach for 15 repetitions.

Exercise 4. Extension of a brush with an expander

Wrap the expander around the palm of your hand. Bend your arms in the elbows at an angle of 90 degrees, turn the palm down, as if doing back bend on the bicep. Slowly unbend the wrist joint, straining the muscles of the forearm. Perform each hand 3 approach for 15 repetitions.

Exercise 5. Tightening of a tennis ball

Squeeze the tennis ball as much as you can without the appearance of pain. Hold 5-10 seconds. Repeat from 8 to 10 times.

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